thepinakes

lecieltumultueux:

Something I love about the librarianship field is the interesting mix of people who decided this was the career for them. But behind this unity is a smattering of other interests, so I’d love to know, what did you study in college?

(I’ll start off. I studied French and…

I started out as a graphic design major, of all things. Honestly, I have no clue why I picked that major or why I thought it was something I would be good. It made it through the first course but dropped the second one a few weeks in when our first assignment was to take a walk and translate that into a graphic representation. O_o After going back and forth between a few different majors, I ended up settling on Art History. I’d already taken several art history courses as part of my art major, and I enjoyed writing papers. It was definitely the right major for me. And I kept the art focus and ended up minoring in photography. I also studied Italian as part of my major which was fun. I’m not very good at learning other languages, but I remember the pronunciation and can do a decent job translating text thanks to my background in Latin from high school. That also came in handy at my current job because they needed someone to translate some Italian books. 

My advice to current undergrads: pick a major that you know you’ll love. :)

laura-in-libraryland

libraryjournal:

THE DIGITAL SHIFT: REINVENTING LIBRARIES
A Virtual Event presented by Library Journal and School Library Journal
Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Since 2010, Library Journal and School Library Journal have produced a successful full-day program tackling the challenges presented by ebooks and…

A great opportunity!

picadorbookroom

picadorbookroom:

Well that explains the voices in our head…

This is so super interesting! I have always, for as long as I can remember, read with sound in my head. Different voices for different narrators and even characters. And if I’m reading something by an author with a distinctive voice, like David Sedaris, I “hear” their writing in my head as I’m reading as their voice. I wonder if another researcher will investigate if this phenomenon influences how much or how little people enjoy reading. I would hypothesize that having voices in one’s head makes for a most excellent bookworm!

I often pray for the health, safety, and happiness of my family and friends and, as a former preschool teacher, I cannot begin to imagine what it would be like to be involved in a situation like what has happened in Connecticut. I also cannot fathom what it would be like as a parent to get that phone call. School is supposed to be a place for kids to learn and grow in a place where they feel safe. It’s extremely disheartening to feel like that is less and less the case these days.
My thoughts and prayers are with the families and children affected by the senseless tragedy in Connecticut today. If you have kiddos in your life, hug them a little tighter and tell them you love them. And if you need advice or tips on how to talk to kids, please visit PBS Parents at the following link: http://www.pbs.org/parents/talkingwithkids/news/talking.html

I often pray for the health, safety, and happiness of my family and friends and, as a former preschool teacher, I cannot begin to imagine what it would be like to be involved in a situation like what has happened in Connecticut. I also cannot fathom what it would be like as a parent to get that phone call. School is supposed to be a place for kids to learn and grow in a place where they feel safe. It’s extremely disheartening to feel like that is less and less the case these days.

My thoughts and prayers are with the families and children affected by the senseless tragedy in Connecticut today. If you have kiddos in your life, hug them a little tighter and tell them you love them. And if you need advice or tips on how to talk to kids, please visit PBS Parents at the following link: http://www.pbs.org/parents/talkingwithkids/news/talking.html

What Should Children Read? by Sara Mosle, via The New York Times
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/22/what-should-children-read/
"What schools really need isn’t more nonfiction but better nonfiction, especially that which provides good models for student writing. Most students could use greater familiarity with what newspaper, magazine and book editors call “narrative nonfiction”: writing that tells a factual story, sometimes even a personal one, but also makes an argument and conveys information in vivid, effective ways."
This is a great article. I was fortunate enough to take AP English classes in junior high and high school with some wonderful, truly gifted teachers who challenged me. I am also fortunate to have parents who instilled in me a love for reading, and my second grade teacher encouraged my reading and love for writing. It’s a great idea for teachers to think outside the box and have their students listen to things like This American Life and read pieces from The New Yorker. The classics, while wonderful and important, are sometimes not as relatable for expository writing lessons. 

What Should Children Read? by Sara Mosle, via The New York Times

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/22/what-should-children-read/

"What schools really need isn’t more nonfiction but better nonfiction, especially that which provides good models for student writing. Most students could use greater familiarity with what newspaper, magazine and book editors call “narrative nonfiction”: writing that tells a factual story, sometimes even a personal one, but also makes an argument and conveys information in vivid, effective ways."

This is a great article. I was fortunate enough to take AP English classes in junior high and high school with some wonderful, truly gifted teachers who challenged me. I am also fortunate to have parents who instilled in me a love for reading, and my second grade teacher encouraged my reading and love for writing. It’s a great idea for teachers to think outside the box and have their students listen to things like This American Life and read pieces from The New Yorker. The classics, while wonderful and important, are sometimes not as relatable for expository writing lessons. 

Tumblarians Webinar Survey

Howdy all! If you’re at all interested in participated in the Tumblarians Webinar or even if you just want to share thoughts on programming ideas, then please take my humble survey:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/XLDK7HT

I need to get a better idea of what everyone’s interest level is, who wants to present, etc. I’m looking forward to hearing from everyone! Please reblog and post the survey link far and wide. Let the collaboration begin!