The ICDL Foundation’s goal is to build a collection of books that represents outstanding historical and contemporary books from throughout the world.  Ultimately, the Foundation aspires to have every culture and language represented so that every child can know and appreciate the riches of children’s literature from the world community.”

What a great project! Explore unique books at home with your kids or consider adding a digital storytime to your existing storytime program. There are books for lots of languages and cultures here! 

I was just thinking about this a little while ago, actually, as I was writing out my to do list for next week. In cursive. Part of the reason I like cursive so much is because it just feels better as you’re writing. It’s almost relaxing. But I really think handwriting and penmanship still need to be taught not just for the skill but for the simple fact of accomplishing something. Learning cursive teaches discipline as well as a valuable skill. Although I hated all of the handwriting exercises we did when I was in the second grade I’m certainly grateful for them now. 

I have several thoughts about this:

1. As someone who attended public school for my entire life in the state of Texas, I do not recall ever learning about any sort of religion. Maybe we discussed Judaism in regards to the Holocaust, but I’m pretty sure that was it. I didn’t learn about a religion such as Sikhism until I was in my 20s, and that’s a shame.

2. That being said, even though the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) states that students should be able to “describe major world religions, including animism, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism, and their spatial distribution,” I think this grant would have gone over better had the school included a discussion of other world religions based on relevant books.

3. I wholeheartedly support and believe very strongly in the separation of church and state, but I think it’s important for students to have a familiarity with world religions and, therefore, people and their experiences in other parts of the world. So in that sense, I don’t understand why only Islam is being presented as part of this program. And I especially don’t understand how school officials didn’t realize that would cause issues with parents. Of course, they probably wouldn’t be protesting if it were any religion other than Islam, but I still think the school could and should have done a better job of presenting a more well-rounded program for students.

4. Attention parents: if the school sends letters informing you of what’s going on in the classroom, you have to actually open and READ them rather than throw them in the junk mail pile. 

Resources for Makerspaces in Libraries

http://goo.gl/WGXql

A free brochure to edit and share! I created it with librarians and educators in mind, and it’s meant to serve as both a guide to how-to resources as well as a makerspace planning tool. Enjoy and please reblog, tweet, etc! I would also love your feedback, especially if you’ve been a part of a makerspace in your library, school, or community. 

beyondherelies0
northbrookpl:

darienlibrary:

whirls:

kalindasharmas: (via afternoonsnoozebutton)

Tip for all my student readers: if you’re too lazy to use a bibliography creator like NoodleBib or RefWorks, let Google generate your bibliography entries for you. All you have to do is google the article/book title in Google Scholar, click “cite” at the bottom of the search result, and copy either the MLA, APA, or Chicago cite into your word document. 


I miss the old days when we had to walk eight miles in the snow while handwriting our Works Cited page.

Oh brave new world! This is great advice for citations.

RefWorks is such a pain in the ass. This would’ve saved me so much time in grad school. 

northbrookpl:

darienlibrary:

whirls:

kalindasharmas: (via afternoonsnoozebutton)

Tip for all my student readers: if you’re too lazy to use a bibliography creator like NoodleBib or RefWorks, let Google generate your bibliography entries for you. All you have to do is google the article/book title in Google Scholar, click “cite” at the bottom of the search result, and copy either the MLA, APA, or Chicago cite into your word document. 

I miss the old days when we had to walk eight miles in the snow while handwriting our Works Cited page.

Oh brave new world! This is great advice for citations.

RefWorks is such a pain in the ass. This would’ve saved me so much time in grad school. 

DON’T GUT THE 42nd STREET LIBRARY!

STOP THE CENTRAL LIBRARY PLAN!

The Central Library Plan (CLP), at enormous cost to New York City and its taxpayers, would irreparably damage the 42nd Street Research Library – one of the world’s great reference libraries and a historic landmark. The CLP would demolish the library’s historic book stacks, install a circulating library in their stead, and displace 1.5 million books to central New Jersey. The new circulating library would replace the Mid-Manhattan Library (at 40th and 5th Avenue) and SIBL (Science, Industry and Business Library, at 34th and Madison), which would both be sold off.

• It will be hugely expensive, costing a minimum of $300 million (probably much more), of which $150 million will come from New York City taxpayers. There is great concern that the Library’s focus on a highly-complex construction project will absorb desperately-needed funds which might otherwise pay for renovations of branch libraries, and replenish slashed curatorial and acquisitions budgets.

• It will radically reduce the space available for the Mid-Manhattan and SIBL.

• It will threaten the 42nd Street Library’s status as one of the world’s great research libraries.

• It will threaten the architectural integrity of the landmarked 42nd Street building.

• It does not take into consideration more efficient and less destructive alternatives, such as combining SIBL and the Mid-Manhattan into a rehabilitated and expanded building on the Mid-Manhattan site.

Underlying the widespread concern is the closed process through which the Library administration has made its decisions. Despite the fact that the 42nd Street building is owned by the city and is one of our most iconic structures, the plan was formulated with minimal public notification and no public input. The $150 million that the city has earmarked for the project was awarded without oversight by the City Council and with no public hearings. If alternatives have been considered they have never been disclosed, and no cost-benefit analysis or detailed budget has ever been presented.

Sign the petition at http://signon.org/sign/save-new-york-city-libraries?source=c.em.mt&r_by=6817161

10 of the Coolest Librarians Alive, via flavorwire
Please allow a librarian a moment to gloat a bit….I have seen the file cabinet above in person. And also as a former zinester, it was pretty damn cool and pretty much left me speechless. It lives at the Fales Collection in the Bobst Library of NYU, which is one of the coolest special collections libraries EVER. Lisa Darms’ book will undoubtedly be amazing as well. Enjoy the rest of the article at the source link below.

10 of the Coolest Librarians Alive, via flavorwire

Please allow a librarian a moment to gloat a bit….I have seen the file cabinet above in person. And also as a former zinester, it was pretty damn cool and pretty much left me speechless. It lives at the Fales Collection in the Bobst Library of NYU, which is one of the coolest special collections libraries EVER. Lisa Darms’ book will undoubtedly be amazing as well. Enjoy the rest of the article at the source link below.