lowscoreattack-deactivated20130

lowscoreattack:

great post with some useful questions to reflect on

One line of questioning I’ve found helpful is asking “what do I love doing?” “When am I most excited and engaged at work?” Do you love working one on one with users? Collaborating with others? Designing events, or projects, or lessons? This can help give you insight into what your strengths are and what gives life for you.

This is a really great post with some excellent points that many librarians and information professionals or even just new graduates in general can reflect on. I think one of the most important things for new librarians to realize is that being a librarian is a JOB and, as with many jobs, you may not immediately love it. It’s important to be open to the fact that you will have to learn much more than what you were taught in library school. And it will be challenging and a little scary and you will certainly have days and maybe even weeks or longer where you are unsure of yourself (I speak from experience here). But keep your head up, give things a chance, and remind yourself why you went to library school in the first place.

theaccidentalexecutive-deactiva
theaccidentalexecutive:

10 Easy Rules to Having a GREAT Work Ethic
Nothing is more important than having a great work ethic. It doesn’t matter whether you work for yourself or someone else, go above and beyond the call of duty. Shine no matter how small the task. Clients, bosses, investors et al NOTICE when you do a good job. From that comes new opportunity. From new opportunity comes growth. Growth will be rewarded with a continued rising in the ranks not to mention confidence, skills, discipline and a GREAT reputation. 
Show up as your best self every day.  THAT is how you find true success. 
1. Be on time and don’t ask to leave early.
2. Ask how you can help.
3. Ask some more.
4. Find out what is expected of you with each and every task. Then exceed those expectations. 
5. Make eye contact and have a firm handshake with everyone you meet.
6. Do your best but know that your best will be different each day. Sometimes you won’t have as much energy, rest, time etc. to accomplish a task so push even harder in these moments. Just do the best you can.
7. Shut up and listen.
8. By all means check in on your social media outlets throughout the day. I do.  But NEVER in a meeting and NEVER when in a conversation with someone. It’s rude.
9. Learn to use constructive criticism and negative feedback to your advantage. There is almost always an element of truth in others painful critique of you, no matter what their motivation for telling you is. We are often unwilling to look at the things we need to change most. Be grateful someone else has made you aware even if their delivery is hard to stomach. Use it as an opportunity to strengthen your weakest areas. Then watch as you become more dynamic, skillful, and well-rounded. Your “enemies” are often gifts in disguise.
10. Be someone people want to work with.
Shannon Fitzgerald/The Accidental Executive

theaccidentalexecutive:

10 Easy Rules to Having a GREAT Work Ethic

Nothing is more important than having a great work ethic. It doesn’t matter whether you work for yourself or someone else, go above and beyond the call of duty. Shine no matter how small the task. Clients, bosses, investors et al NOTICE when you do a good job. From that comes new opportunity. From new opportunity comes growth. Growth will be rewarded with a continued rising in the ranks not to mention confidence, skills, discipline and a GREAT reputation. 

Show up as your best self every day.  THAT is how you find true success. 

1. Be on time and don’t ask to leave early.

2. Ask how you can help.

3. Ask some more.

4. Find out what is expected of you with each and every task. Then exceed those expectations. 

5. Make eye contact and have a firm handshake with everyone you meet.

6. Do your best but know that your best will be different each day. Sometimes you won’t have as much energy, rest, time etc. to accomplish a task so push even harder in these moments. Just do the best you can.

7. Shut up and listen.

8. By all means check in on your social media outlets throughout the day. I do.  But NEVER in a meeting and NEVER when in a conversation with someone. It’s rude.

9. Learn to use constructive criticism and negative feedback to your advantage. There is almost always an element of truth in others painful critique of you, no matter what their motivation for telling you is. We are often unwilling to look at the things we need to change most. Be grateful someone else has made you aware even if their delivery is hard to stomach. Use it as an opportunity to strengthen your weakest areas. Then watch as you become more dynamic, skillful, and well-rounded. Your “enemies” are often gifts in disguise.

10. Be someone people want to work with.

Shannon Fitzgerald/The Accidental Executive